BOMB WARNING

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Bomb that was safely remove to Hells Point for render safe.
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Police: keep away from all WWII devices

BY JENNIFER KUSAPA

MEMBERS of the public have been warned to keep away from World War II bombs (Unexploded Ordinances or UXO) because these devices were designed to kill and destroy.

The warning came after one person died and another in critical condition last Friday.

The duo were tampering with a World War II bomb at Hells Point, east of Honiara, when it exploded.

Officer In-charge (OIC) of the Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Team of the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force (RSIPF) Clifford Tunuki said his advice to the public is to keep away from any WWII devices.

“If anyone sees any bomb or any item that you are suspicious of; call your nearest police station or the free toll line 999,” Tunuki said.

“You are putting you life at great risk if you try to open or play with any WWII bomb,” he added.

He said from the evidence located and gathered at the scene, it indicated that the two men were tampering with the bomb, causing it to explode.

Tunuki said a hammer, screw drivers, hacksaw blades, spade and bush knives found at the scene confirmed this.

Fresh ground excavations using spades were also seen at the site.

Multiple UXOs items were lying around the incident site and others on top of the excavated soil.

He said upon arrival of the EOD team, the victims of the bomb blast were still at the incident site.

St. John Ambulance was alerted and later transported the victims to the National Referral Hospital (NRH).

“The condition of the other casualty is a matter for the health authorities to let us know,” Tunuki said.

“Our condolences to the family and relatives of the deceased for the loss of their loved one.”

 “I kindly remind us that bomb is designed for two purposes. They are designed to kill and destroy.

“Always remember that if you suspect an item that may contain something dangerous or you do not know what it is, then call the Police free toll line on phone 999 or call EOD on phone 7495215.”


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