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Solomon Islands National Parliament
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Corruption remains an issue, says TSI deputy chair Kingmele

By EDDIE OSIFELO

CORRUPTION remains a big problem in the Government and business sector.

Vice Chairman of Transparency Solomon Islands, Rodney Kingmele stated this during the launch of the Global Corruption Barometer 2021 Pacific in Honiara yesterday.

It is a snapshot of the views of over 6000 people across the 10 countries and territories in the Pacific.

Kingmele said the results are worrying.

For Solomon Islands based on people who have used relevant public service in the last two months:

  1. 60 percent think that companies frequently use money or connection to secure government contracts
  2. 33 percent have experienced sextortion or know someone who has used sex to access public service
  3. 25 percent were offered bribes in exchange for vote
  4. 21 percent paid a bribes for public service

He said only 18 percent of respondents thought that officials who engaged in corruption frequently faced consequences.

“Unfortunately, this is a reflection of the lack of faith and trust that our people currently have in our laws and integrity institutions to be able to adequately deal with corruption,” Kingmele, a lawyer by profession said.

In addition, he said 97 percent of those interviewed said that corruption exist within the government, whilst 90 percent stated that corruption was also present in business sector.

 Kingmele said in terms of bribery and personal connections, overall, 21 percent of the respondents say that they have in the past witnessed bribery whilst 36 percent stated that they had witnessed the use of personal connections to access public service.

He said it is also a matter of concern that 17 percent said that they have come across bribery involving the police whilst a further 30 percent stated that they had come across the use of personal connections in dealing with police.

Likewise, Kingmele said 13 percent stated that bribes had been involved in receiving government documents whilst 27 percent stated that personal connections had been involved to obtain such document.


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